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Catharina Svanborg, et al.

Breast Milk vs Cancer




https://www.naturalnews.com/2018-07-23-the-unique-complex-of-protein-and-fats-found-in-human-breast-milk-kills-over-40-types-of-cancer.html

The unique complex of protein and fats found in human breast milk KILLS over 40 types of cancer
by: Vicki Batts   

Breast milk as a cancer-killer

Professor Catharina Svanborg has been paving the road to capitalizing on breast milk’s cancer-fighting abilities out of her lab at Lund University in Sweden. Specifically, the professor has been working on a way to bind a breast milk protein known as alpha-lactalbumin to oleic acid, a fatty acid found in olive oil, nuts and seeds.

The cancer-killing combination she’s dubbed HAMLET (an acronym for human alpha-lactalbumin made lethal to tumor cells) has shown great success in laboratory applications, shrinking brain, bladder and colon tumors with ease. Tests involving animal and human cancer cell lines have shown that HAMLET is effective against at least 40 types of cancer.

“Looking down the microscope at the dying tumor cells, we were quite excited, especially when the experiment was repeated and showed the same effect twice. We had used non-cancerous cells for a long time in similar experiments and they had not died,” Svanborg told The Telegraph, speaking about the amazing way breast milk kills cancer.

But the funny thing is that Svanborg discovered all of this two decades ago.

Overcoming skepticism and doubt

Svanborg reportedly went onto patent her confirmed discovery in 1995. She published her research, hoping to take the cancer industry by storm with her amazing find. But instead of being met with praise and applause, she was simply met with disbelief.

“There was a certain degree of skepticism. It is about being let into the cancer community more than anything else,” the professor contended. As a university professor and immunologist, Svanborg wasn’t considered part of the cancer or pharmaceutical industries — and she struggled to have her work taken seriously. As a specialist in infectious diseases, and a threat to the profit-driven cancer industry, her research on breast milk and cancer fell on deaf ears.

But Svanborg was determined and would not be deterred. “One has to be stubborn when it is a journey into unchartered territory,” she said. For the last 20 years, Svanborg has continued her research and continues to turn her skeptics into believers, one by one.

“It is an absolutely thrilling project. If you hang in there, it opens up new ways of thinking about protein structure, cell biology and the nature of cancer. People are coming around to the fact that this is very well supported by in-depth studies,” Svanborg contended. The team recently developed a way to mass produce HAMLET, which means it could soon become a widely used cancer treatment. Her game-changing discovery promises to kill cancer cells without damaging health cells — a feat that eludes conventional treatments like chemo.

Though HAMLET still has a ways to go before becoming an approved form of treatment that’s available to the masses, Svanborg remains hopeful....



https://www.telegraph.co.uk/health-fitness/body/meet-woman-trying-cure-cancer-breast-milk/

Meet the woman trying to cure cancer through breast milk

In a picturesque medieval town stands the ivy-covered Lund University, proudly displaying a historic crest dating back to 1666.

The exterior of this Swedish institution may exude heritage but inside its thick stone walls, pioneering scientists are crossing new frontiers in cancer research.

Leading the charge is Professor Catharina Svanborg, who has spent the past two decades experimenting with human breast milk.

As unbelievable as it sounds, back in the early Nineties, Svanborg and her postgraduate student Anders Håkansson accidently discovered that a protein found in breast milk can kill cancer cells.

They were experimenting with breast milk to try to understand how it was able to fight off germs. A common scientific practice is to use human cancer cells in these tests because they behave similarly to other human cells and live indefinitely in laboratory dishes.

"There was a certain degree of scepticism. It is about being let into the cancer community more than anything else"Prof Svanborg

To their surprise, the pair realised that the cancer cells were inexplicably disappearing and on closer inspection Svanborg realised the breast milk was causing them to "commit suicide".

"Looking down the microscope at the dying tumor cells, we were quite excited, especially when the experiment was repeated and showed the same effect twice. We had used non cancerous cells for a long time in similar experiments and they had not died," she explains.

Further in vitro experiments confirmed that when human milk protein (called alpha-lactalbumin) binds to a fatty acid it creates a unique tumour-killing protein-lipid complex that has the ability to destroy cancer cells. It rapidly shrinks the most aggressive type of invasive brain tumour as well as bladder cancer and colon cancer tumours.

Svanborg named this Hamlet (Human alpha-lactalbumin made lethal to tumour cells) and patented the discovery. She then set about informing the scientific world and published her first research paper in one of the most-cited multidisciplinary scientific journals, the Proceedings of the National Academy of Science, in 1995.

But instead of being met with worldwide acclaim, Svanborg and her associates were met with disbelief.

As an immunologist working in a university, Svanborg was not part of the cancer research and pharmaceutical development community, and initially struggled to have her research taken seriously.

Her expertise in infectious disease, rather than cancer research, meant that Svanborg had less clout - particularly as she was challenging the current dogma.

Back in 1999, David Salomon - a cancer researcher at the National Cancer Institute in America - told Discovery magazine that if Svanborg's research had come from a well known laboratory, journalists would be calling "six days to Sunday. You’d have scientists eager to collaborate. But it’s coming from a small lab in a foreign country. It’s like General Motors versus a garage operation.”

It's something Svanborg is all too aware of. "There was a certain degree of scepticism" she says, choosing her words carefully. "It is about being let into the cancer community more than anything else.

"A common response I’d get would be 'we don't get it, but we can't fault the research'," says Svanborg.

Undeterred, she doggedly set off to "take the tiger by the tail" and prove her discovery was legitimate: "One has to be stubborn when it is a journey into unchartered territory".

So, for the past 20 years, she has been doing just that - breaking new ground and slowly winning over the sceptics by building up a wealth of conclusive scientific data. Her small team of around a dozen scientists have been testing Hamlet on animals and humans, showing time and again that it can kill over 40 cancers but leaves healthy cells unharmed.

Tests on mice revealed that Hamlet limited the development of brain tumours and bladder cancer. It also prevented the development of colon cancer in baby mice, when given in their drinking water, suggesting that it might also be developed to prevent tumour development in genetically susceptible individuals.

In one human test, nine bladder cancer patients were administered five daily doses of Hamlet via a catheter in the week preceding surgery to remove their tumour. Eight out of the nine started passing tumours cells in their urine just two hours after being given it, and their tumour reduced in size or character. Adjacent healthy tissue showed no sign of toxicity.

These types of breakthroughs have kept Svanborg determined to get her treatment onto the market. She has used the years judiciously to amass a convincing body of data, including scores of articles in prestigious science journals such as The International Journal of Cancer, Oncogene, Experimental Cell Research and Molecular Microbiology.
"This is a game-changing discovery for potential cancer treatments for the future"Prof Svanborg

She remains excited as ever about the research: "It is an absolutely thrilling project. If you hang in there, it opens up new ways of thinking about protein structure, cell biology and the nature of cancer. People are coming around to the fact that this is very well supported by in depth studies."

Indeed other researchers, such as assistant professor Dagmar Zweytick at the University of Graz in Austria, are now experimenting with similar techniques using different breast milk molecules to treat cancer cells in the lab. However their research is in its infancy with only three publications to date.

With the cancer research community starting to thaw, Svanborg was in a better position than ever to reveal her latest findings at the Medela breastfeeding and lactation symposium in Florence, Italy last week.

Her team has finally discovered how to mass produce a synthetic form of Hamlet, meaning it is now ready to be developed into a new cancer treatment drug.

“Who would have thought that breast milk had the potential to kill cancer cells?” said Dr. Leon Mitoulas, scientific director of the symposium.

“We are truly on the cusp of a golden age for research in human milk. It is an infinitely complex fluid, and intensive, multidisciplinary studies, utilising cutting-edge techniques, have only been employed in this field the past decade."

Talking from her hotel room in Florence, an elated Svanborg explains why this innovation is so important.

"Hamlet is ready to become a new drug. We have all the things ready but we are now proceeding with all the necessary steps, tests and clinical trials all working towards the goals to create a new cancer therapy."

These large scale clinical trials will be tested on colon, bladder and cervical cancer - as well as other forms that have been historically difficult to cure.

Although there are currently many effective cancer treatments available, what makes Hamlet unique is its ability to target specific tumours, with apparently little or no side effects.

Unlike chemotherapy and radiotherapy - which destroy some healthy cells causing side effects such as nerve damage, loss of hair and nausea - it is seemingly not toxic to healthy cells.

"This is a game-changing discovery for potential cancer treatments for the future. To have been leading this project is something that I am very proud of and I am entirely grateful to all my team members, who have been working tirelessly, to get where we are today – in a position of being ready to create a new drug," said Svanborg.

But the journey is far from over. Hamlet still needs investment from "big pharma" to become available to the public and Svanborg won't be drawn on how many years this could take.

“We are not yet able to say when it will be fully tested, approved, and produced as a cancer therapy drug, but we are working very hard towards the goal that Hamlet will be available for patients who need alternative therapies."

And leading research institutions still remain cautious. Dr Justine Alford, Cancer Research UK’s senior science information officer, said: “This research doesn’t provide any evidence that breast milk has any cancer-fighting properties.    

"We’re years away from knowing whether the drug is better than existing treatments and we’ll need to wait for results from larger clinical trials to find out"Dr Justine Alford, Cancer Research UK

“Research has shown that a man-made version of a molecule found in breast milk has some positive effects treating mice with cancer, and early clinical trial results show that the drug is safe for people to take.

“But we’re years away from knowing whether the drug is better than existing treatments and we’ll need to wait for results from larger clinical trials to find this out.

“Developing a new cancer treatment can take a long time, because all new drugs have to be rigorously tested to make sure they are safe and stand a good chance of working before they are tested in people.”

Committed as ever and convinced of the importance of her discovery, Svanborg is now putting everything in place to hand the Hamlet baton onto a drug development company.

Like the mother of an extraordinary child - albeit an accidental one - she is now preparing for her baby to leave the nest.

But despite all her emotional and professional investment in the project  if Hamlet does make it onto the market Svanborg refuses to profit from it financially.

She says, "The team have all agreed if we ever make money it will go into a research foundation to channel it back into society."



http://discovermagazine.com/1999/jun/featcancer

Got Cancer Killers?

Breast-feeding protects babies from cancer, but no one knows quite how. So when biologists in Catharina Svanborg's lab saw mothers' milk kill cancer cells, they knew they were onto something big.

By Peter Radetsky, Thomas Wester

When Catharina Svanborg and her research associates began mixing mothers' milk and cancer cells together seven years ago, she wasn't looking for a cure for cancer; she was after a way to fight germs. Nevertheless, the physician and immunologist at Lund University in Sweden has discovered that a previously taken-for-granted component of ordinary human breast milk compels cancer cells -- every type of cancer cell tested -- to die. Now Svanborg must prove her discovery, demonstrating to wary scientists that her surprising find is for real. So far, it hasn't been easy.

“It’s an extremely important observation, interesting and provocative,” says breast cancer researcher David Salomon of the National Cancer Institute. “But it’s novel, and novelty always runs the risk of challenging the current dogma. A lot of times you run up against a brick wall of people who have tunnel vision.”

It doesn’t help that Svanborg’s lab is not a large, high-profile cancer research facility. In fact, it’s not a cancer lab at all; her specialty is an entirely different field, infectious disease. Says Salomon: “If this work had come from a well-known lab at the NCI, you’d have reporters calling six days to Sunday. You’d have scientists eager to collaborate. But it’s coming from a small lab in a foreign country. It’s like General Motors versus a garage operation.”

If so, this is the kind of garage you’d take your Porsche to. Tall, poised, and professional to the core, Svanborg leads a team of dedicated young researchers who have worked overtime to make their discovery matter. With the first phase of research finally finished, the group has decided to launch a fusillade of papers to scientific journals. Soon skeptics may have a tough time denying that they are onto something big.

Lund is dark and bleak in winter. A medieval town of 95,000 people (almost half are students), it nestles into Sweden’s southern tip. At its heart stands a twelfth-century cathedral with Romanesque towers that disappear into the gloomy low mist. As an occasional vehicle slowly skirts the town’s commons, bundled bicyclists glide by silently. People hunch forward against the cold. Across the way, university halls from the seventeenth century proclaim in stone Lund’s role as Scandinavia’s historical center of learning.

So it is a surprise, away from the town center, to come suddenly upon modern brick and concrete buildings: the university hospital, the library, science classrooms, laboratories. It was here nearly seven years ago that her student Anders Håkansson rushed into Svanborg’s office with perplexing news. He had been experimenting with human cancer cells, microbes, and mothers’ milk. (Like lab mice, cancer cells make popular experimental models because they come in standardized lab strains. In many important respects they behave just like other human cells, and they live indefinitely in lab dishes.) The idea was to pinpoint how the milk, a terrific germ-fighter, blocks bacteria from infecting other cells. But the cancer cells in this experiment were acting up. “Their volume was decreasing,” Håkansson recalls. “Their nuclei were shrinking. Something was wrong.”

When Svanborg sat down at the microscope, she diagnosed the problem immediately. “The cancer cells,” she announced in her calm, deliberate manner, “are committing suicide.”

Cells commit suicide all the time, a phenomenon called apoptosis, in which the body rids itself of old or unnecessary cells (see “Apoptosis,” on page 73). They simply fall apart and are recycled. For cancer cells, however, suicide is rare indeed. Their defining characteristic is uncontrolled reproduction. Yet somehow, the breast milk induced these cancer cells to take their own lives.

The circumstance opened up an enormous vista of mysteries—which pleased Svanborg to no end. “Discovery is at the heart of science. If you ask me for specific goals, I wouldn’t be able to name them. The process is fascinating enough.” Svanborg was eager to dive into finding out what in mothers’ milk was killing the cancer cells.

“And I always hope that new information will be practical and useful for people who need it,” she adds, the physician rising to the fore. Discerning the basic mechanism wasn’t enough—Svanborg wanted to find out if the cells might be induced to commit suicide on demand: Could the discovery be developed into a cancer cure?

Attempting to do so would require manpower, and fewer than 20 people worked in Svanborg’s lab. Most were already involved in their own projects targeting infectious diseases. “If this were a pharmaceutical company, you could say, ‘Take a bunch of people and move them to this,’” Svanborg says. “But this is a university. These are students. If they already have thesis projects going, you can’t change their focus just like that.”

“You have freedom here,” says a graduate student. “Although we’re still in training, we are working as scientists. Catharina is very good at giving feedback, but we get to decide what experiments to do and how to do them.”

Which is also the way their professor likes it: “I want to facilitate creative environments. I like encouraging people to contribute based on who they are and what they think. After all, this cancer find is pure serendipity. And serendipity arises when people are in a situation that fosters creativity. Nobody can define how it happens, but there’s a lot of happiness involved.” So when Svanborg decided to go after the cancer, she couldn’t just pull her colleagues from their projects to help her. The undertaking would largely fall to her and Håkansson alone.



Patents

US2015216945
PROPHYLACTIC AND NUTRACEUTICAL THERAPY
A biologically active complex comprising a polypeptide having the sequence of a naturally occurring protein or a variant thereof, wherein said polypeptide is at least partially unfolded as compared to the said naturally occurring protein for example as a result of a modification of at least one cysteine residue; or a peptide of up to 50 amino acids; and a fatty acid or lipid or a salt thereof, for use in prophylactic treatment of cancers, in particular of the gastrointestinal tract. Compositions that may comprise the complex and have use as nutraceuticals are obtainable from milk or milk fractions and form a further aspect of the invention. Methods of treatment in particular for the prevention of cancer form a further aspect of the invention.A biologically active complex comprising a polypeptide having the sequence of a naturally occurring protein or a variant thereof, wherein said polypeptide is at least partially unfolded as compared to the said naturally occurring protein for example as a result of a modification of at least one cysteine residue; or a peptide of up to 50 amino acids; and a fatty acid or lipid or a salt thereof, for use in prophylactic treatment of cancers, in particular of the gastrointestinal tract. Compositions that may comprise the complex and have use as nutraceuticals are obtainable from milk or milk fractions and form a further aspect of the invention. Methods of treatment in particular for the prevention of cancer form a further aspect of the invention.

NOVEL THERAPY
US2018125939
A method for treating cystitis, in particular acute cystitis, comprising administering to a patient in need thereof, an effective amount of a reagent selected from the group consisting of IL-1β inhibitors and MMP inhibitors, or proteins selected from ASC or NLRP-3. Diagnostic methods are also described and claimed.

NOVEL THERAPY
US2018112215
A method for treating cystitis, in particular acute cystitis, comprising administering to a patient in need thereof, an effective amount of a reagent selected from the group consisting of IL-1β inhibitors and MMP inhibitors, or proteins selected from ASC or NLRP-3. Diagnostic methods are also described and claimed.

THERAPEUTICALLY ACTIVE COMPLEXES
WO2018116165
A biologically active complex comprising a peptide of up to 50 amino acids in length which comprises an alpha-helical domain of a protein which has membrane perturbing activity or a variant thereof which lacks cysteine residues, and oleic acid or a salt thereof, provided the protein is other than alpha-lactalbumin. Complexes of this type are useful in therapy, in particular cancer therapy.

INHIBITOR OF RNA POLYMERASE II
WO2018073725
An inhibitor of RNA polymerase II is described, wherein said inhibitor is selected a moiety which targets a protein selected from cyclin kinase 12 (CDK12) or its recruiting protein PAF1C. Particular examples of such inhibitors are polypeptides expressed by a gene selected from IldD, IldR, nlpD or rfaH of a bacterial species, such as a commensal bacteria or asymptomatic carrier, or a variant of said protein. Inhibitors may be based upon bacterial Sigma S or NplD proteins. These inhibitors are useful in therapies, to suppress protein expression. Thus they may be used as immunosuppressants, anti-inflammatory or anti- infection agents.

NOVEL THERAPY
WO2018069886
A therapeutic agent comprising a bacteria which expresses an inhibitor of MYC activity or a extract or product obtainable therefrom, for use in for use in the prevention or treatment o disease wherein MYC levels are elevated, such as cancer. Inhibitors of MYC activity comprising a factor obtainable from bacteria are novel and form a further aspect of the invention.

BIOLOGICALLY ACTIVE COMPLEX AND ITS PREPARATION
 US9085643  //   US9487561
Biologically active complex and its preparation A biologically active complex comprising either a polypeptide having the sequence of a variant of a naturally occurring protein, wherein said polypeptide is at least partially unfolded as compared to the said naturally occurring protein; or a peptide of up to 50 amino acids, for instance a fragment of the naturally occurring protein or a variant thereof; and a pharmaceutically acceptable salt of a fatty acid or lipid. The complexes of the invention demonstrate a novel mode of action, that gives rise to opportunities for the development of further active agents and screening methods.

NOVEL THERAPY
WO2018007920
An antagonist of Neurokinin-1 receptor (NKIR), or its ligand Substance P (SP), for use in the treatment of bacterial infections, in particular acute cystitis, or for the management of pain related to the bacterial infection. Compositions for use in this manner form a further aspect of the invention, together with methods of treatment.

COMPLEX AND PRODUCTION PROCESS
US8796218
A method for preparing a biologically active complex, said method comprising a recombinant protein having the sequence of a-lactalbumin, such as human a- lactalbumin or a fragment thereof but which lacks intra-molecular disulfide bonds, and oleic acid, and process for preparing this are described and claimed. The recombinant protein suitably has cysteines found in the native protein changed to other amino acids, such as alanine. Improvements in recombinant expression, process rationalisation and yields of biologically active complexes, as well as the complexes obtained are also described and claimed.

LACTALBUMIN PRODUCTION PROCESS
EP1867658
A method for producing an oligomeric form of ±-lactalbumin which is in the molten globule-like state is described. The method suitably comprises exposing a source of ±-lactalbumin in which the ±-lactalbumin is preferably in the molten globule-like state, to an ion exchange medium which has been pre-treated with casein or an active component thereof, such as oleic acid, and recovering ±-lactalbumin in an oligomeric form therefrom. Pre-treatment of the ion exchange medium, particularly with casein derived from human milk, has been found to significantly improve yields of the oligomeric form of ±-lactalbumin and means that it can readily be isolated from readily available sources such as bovine ±-lactalbumin. This form of ±-lactalbumin is useful therapeutically, in particular as an antibacterial agent and also as an anti-cancer therapeutic.

Therapeutic Combination
US2009036368
A combination of component (i) which is HAMLET or a biologically active modification thereof, or a biologically active fragment of either of these, and component (ii) which is a histone deacetylase (HDAC) inhibitor. This combination shows synergistic effects in the treatment of for example proliferative diseases such as those which produce tumours.

Active complex of alpha-lactalbumin (HAMLET) and cofactor
US7713533
The use of a biologically active complex of alpha-lactalbumin, selected from HAMLET (human alpha-lactalbumin made lethal to tumour cells) or a biologically active modification thereof, or a biologically active fragment of either of these, in the preparation of a medicament for use in the treatment of papilloma, such as cutaneous papillomas.

Antibacterial composition
US5968901
The present invention relates to a use of casein derived from milks, preferably human milk, and porcine milk, for the preparation of a substrate for the prophylactic and/or therapeutic treatment of infections of the respiratory tract caused by S. pneumoniae and/or H. influenzae, as well as the diagnostic use of such compositions for diagnosing infections caused by said bacteria.

Protein complex from ion-exchange chromatography of casein for treatment of bacterial infections
US6599874
Antibacterial protein complexes designated as Anti-adhesive Lactalbumin Like Protein (ALLP) are obtained by ion-exchange chromatography of casein and alpha-lactalbumin. Casein isolated from human milk by acid precipitation is subjected to ion-exchange chromatography using an NaCl gradient to obtain six fractions. Fraction six contains the antibacterial protein complex and is recovered. Ion-exchange chromatography of human or bovine alpha-lactalbumin using an NaCl gradient resulted in a fraction that was retained and eluted that contained an antibacterial multimeric protein complex. The protein complexes inhibit attachment of S. pneumoniae and H. influenzae to human respiratory tract epithelial cells when tested in vitro, and the protein complexes can be used to treat a bacterial infection in the respiratory tract. The protein complexes are administered in a pharmaceutical composition or in a food or feed-stuff.

Lactalbumin for Inhibiting Angiogenesis
US2008039381
The use of a biologically active complex of alpha-lactalbumin, selected from HAMLET (human alpha-lactalbumin made lethal to tumour cells) or a biologically active modification thereof, or a biologically active fragment of either of these, in the preparation of a medicament for use in the treatments of proliferative disease and in particular of mucosal cancers such as bladder cancer or malignant melanoma, as well as tumours of internal organs such as glioblastoma, as well as in the inhibition of angiogenesis.

Use of Hamlet (Human Alpha-Lactalbumin Made Lethal to Tumour Cells) for Treating Viral Infections
US2007232550
The use of a biologically active complex of alpha-lactalbumin, selected from HAMLET (human alpha-lactalbumin made lethal to tumour cells) or a biologically active modification thereof, or a biologically active fragment of either of these, in the preparation of a medicament for use in the treatment of viral infections.

Therapeutic agents
US6808930
An agent comprising a protein complex comprising an oligomeric form of alpha-lactalbumin (MAL) and a further reagent which is combined with MAL such that it is carried into the nucleoplasm of cells which are susceptible to MAL. Agents of the type, where the further reagent is a therapeutic or labelling reagent, can be used in diagnosis and therapy in particular of cancer.

Lactalbumin production process
US7053185
A method for producing an oligomeric form of alpha-lactalbumin which is in the molten globule-like state is described. The method suitably comprises exposing
a source of alpha-lactalbumin in which the alpha-lactalbumin is preferably in the molten globule-like state, to an ion exchange medium which has been pre-
treated with casein or an active component thereof, such as oleic acid, and recovering alpha-lactalbumin in an oligomeric form therefrom. Pre-treatment of
the ion exchange medium, particularly with casein derived from human milk, has been found to significantly improve yields of the oligomeric form of alpha-lactalbumin and means that it can be readily isolated from readily available sources such as bovine alpha-lactalbumin. This form of alpha-lactalbumin is useful therapeutically, in particular as an antibacterial agent and also as an anti-cancer therapeutic.

Novel therapies and methods of screening for therapeutic compounds
US2006233807
A method for killing cells, said method comprising introducing into the nucleus of the cell, a moiety (other than HAMLET) which inhibits histone activity. This
method will be useful for example in the treatment of cancer for antibacterial activity. Histones can be used as a basis of screening methods to select therapeutic compounds, and these are also described and claimed.

Biologically active complex
US2005085416
A biologically active complex comprising alpha-lactalbumin or a variant of alpha-lactalbumin which is in the apo folding state, or a fragment of either of any of these, and a cofar which stabilizes the complex in a biologically active form, provided that any fragment of alpha-lactalbumin or a variant thereof comprises a region corresponding to the region of alpha-lactalbumin which forms the interface between the alpha and beta domains, and further provided that when the complex comprises native alpha-lactalbumin, the cofactor is other than C18:1:9 cis fatty acid. These complexes have therapeutic applications for example in the treatment of cancer and as antibacterial agents.

Glycosphingalipids for inhibiting bacterial adherence
US4464360
Pharmaceutical preparations containing globotetraosylceramide, globotriaozylceramide or globotetraos, and the use of said preparations or compounds for treatment, prophylaxis or diagnosis of bacterial infections in the urinary tract. The compounds have the ability to inhibit the adherence of bacteria to human urinary tract epithelial cells.

A CASEIN FRACTION FOR THERAPEUTIC, PROFYLACTIC AND/OR DIAGNOSTIC USE IN INFECTIONS OF THE RESPIRATORY TRACT
WO9106308
The present invention relates to a use of casein derived from milks, preferably human milk, and porcine milk, for the preparation of a substrate for the prophylactic and/or therapeutic treatment of infections of the respiratory tract caused by S. pneumoniae and/or H. influenzae, as well as the diagnostic use of such compositions for diagnosing infections caused by said bacteria.