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Gene KELLEY

WindWing







http://www.VenturaCountyStar.com ( 5 August, 2007 )

Developers Trying to Harness Earth's Energy in New Way

The Power of Wind

By Allison Bruce
 

Gene Kelley, above, shows off his WindWing, which he and fellow W2 Energy partners believe can replace current propeller-driven wind turbines. According to Kelley, the WindWing can produce much more energy at a fraction of the cost. Photo by Karen Quincy Loberg

Website : http://w2energycorp.com

W2 Energy Development Corp.
402 E. Gutierrez Street
Santa Barbara, CA 93101

Phone: (805) 879-5215
 

A Santa Barbara company may have a simple solution for wind energy -- all from taking a look at a different part of the plane.

While most wind turbines these days are built as propellers, Gene Kelley is convinced that wings are a better answer for capturing wind energy. Though the physics and work that has gone into his invention can get complex, the underlying concept of his "WindWing" is basic enough for a child to understand.

Anyone who has stuck a hand out of a car window has felt how the WindWing works. As the hand is tilted upward, the wind pushes the hand up. As it tilts downward, the wind pushes it down.

The resulting up-and-down motion, or oscillation, is what gives the WindWing its power.

Kelley, a flight buff with decades of aviation experience added to his work as a "human factors engineer," said the use of a wing as opposed to a propeller creates a simpler and more efficient way to capture the energy of the wind.

The wing concept could be applied to water as well. Kelley said it could apply to any flowing, fluid medium. For now, the company is focusing on the WindWing to prove the concept.

He filed a patent application in 2005 and is awaiting its approval.

"We want to build a better way of harvesting energy from whatever renewable source there is," Kelley said.

Kelley, who started a company called InnovaTech LLC for his research about 14 months ago, has a diverse background when it comes to invention. In his 40 years of experience, he's worked on projects from coal mines to aircraft carriers. He was on the research team that developed the "rumble strips" that let drivers know when they're veering off the road.

Kelley started W2 Energy Development Corp. about five months ago to develop the concept of the WindWing.

His original thought was to create inexpensive, portable power for emergencies around the world, such as tsunamis and earthquakes. He had planned to create a foundation to build and give away the technology.

But it turned out the best way to develop the technology was through a corporation, complete with opportunities for investment that would bring in money to drive the development. Kelley still hopes to build a foundation to achieve his original philanthropic goal.

The first step after starting W2 was to build a prototype that would prove that the basic concept was valid. Months of work and scavenged parts went into building the prototype that now sits in a small room in the back of a hangar at the Santa Barbara Airport.

Kelley and David Buckalew, W2 vice president for information resources, built the prototype with a lot of trial and error. The wings were constructed of sheets of metal in Kelley's backyard and parts of the device come from the mechanism used to control a car window, plus the kinds of weights you would find at your local gym. Other parts were custom made by a machine shop.

The prototype consists of four wings on one end and weights on the other. The weighted end of the bar is short -- one foot long compared to the 10 feet on the other end where the wings sit. Kelley compares the balancing of the bar on its central support pole to balancing weight on a teeter-totter.

Increasing lift

Because the lever is built at a 10-1 ratio, the force of the wind is magnified, so that 200 pounds of lift on the wings translates into one ton of useful force. In practical application, the ratio will be determined by factors such as wind conditions and wing length.

When a fan is turned on in the prototype room, the 6.7 mph breeze starts to push the wing end upward. When the wings reach the top, a position sensor is tripped and the orientation of the wings tilts downward, changing their "angle of attack." The wings are then pushed downward until they reach the bottom and the wing angle changes again.

The system moves gently, with springs on the central pole that compress as the bar reaches the top and bottom of its movement and springs back to give the bar a shove in the opposite direction. That means energy isn't lost in turning the lever.

The up-and-down flapping hints at one of the system's benefits over its propeller-equipped kin -- that it is less likely to kill birds.

In the actual working model, a rod and pump or generator would be attached to the weighted end. As it moves up and down with the wind, it could be used to compress air, pump water or generate electricity.

"It's going to be a very, very successful technology," said Ron Pretlac, chief operating officer. "Because of the applications, it creates a whole variety of new solutions."

Wind energy currently provides less than 1 percent of the electricity used in the United States, according to the American Wind Energy Association. The association supports President Bush's assertion that up to 20 percent of the nation's electricity could come from wind.

Reducing carbon dioxide emissions

If 10 percent of wind power potential from the nation's 10 windiest states was captured, it could reduce U.S. carbon dioxide emissions by almost one-third, the association reports.

Wind energy is a hot place to be these days, said Christine Real de Azua, assistant director of communications for the American Wind Energy Association.

"There's a lot of opportunity and wind energy attracts a lot of new concepts," she said. "It's all very exciting."

She said demand has grown at such a rate that wind turbines are sold out through this year and into next. Companies are investing in more manufacturing facilities to meet that demand.

Those at W2 are convinced their approach could convince more people of the merits of wind power. Most important is the matter of efficiency.

Real de Azua said the industry "manufactures and produces wind turbines that are proven and reliable and efficient in the market."

A wind turbine today will convert up to 45 percent of the energy from the wind it encounters into electricity, said John Dunlop, technical services senior engineer for the American Wind Energy Association.

Propeller turbines have increased in productivity as blades were improved, maintenance was scheduled for when the wind was slow and people were able to operate turbines for longer periods of time, he said.

Kelley doesn't disagree that the propeller turbines can capture energy from they wind they come in contact with, but he's concerned about all the wind those three blades are missing.

That's because the three blades have a small surface area that makes contact with the wind at any point in time. He said it ends up equating to capturing only 5 percent of the wind energy in a column of air. The wind also tends to hit different parts of the blades at different speeds, so the propeller is constantly having to make adjustments, which takes energy.

With the WindWing, the wings put more surface area in contact with the wind. This provides more lift, which translates into more power. The WindWing is about 40 to 60 percent efficient at getting power from the wind, W2 reports.

Several WindWings could be stacked on a single tower, so that those at different levels could each be adjusted to get the most out of the different wind speeds. The angle of the wings can be adjusted so that there is a high angle for a light wind and a low angle for a strong wind.

The company is researching how many WindWings can be stacked on the same pole. The design is also scalable, so that the wings could range from the size of a conference room table to that of a Boeing 747 "jumbo jet."

Those at W2 said it would take far fewer towers to get the same amount of power generated by propeller turbines. A single WindWing could replace eight to 12 propellers, Kelley said.

There's also the lower cost.

Because of its simple design, the WindWing would be less expensive to make.

A cheaper option

A utility-scale propeller turbine, with blades that can reach more than 40 meters in length and generate 1.8 megawatts of power, can run more than $1.5 million. Smaller, residential- or farm-sized turbines run from a few thousand to up to $80,000, according to the American Wind Energy Association.

Though it is still in the early stages of development, Kelley said the WindWing could cost as little as one-tenth of what it costs for a propeller turbine. Of course, the location of the installation and other factors could affect the cost.

Then there are the little pluses, such as the ability to mount solar cells on the wings, letting them do double-duty in power generation.

It all comes down to a system that makes more sense for users and the environment, Kelley said.

The idea has generated international interest. Though those with the company did not want to talk specifics, they said they were pursuing possibilities for both the WindWing and its close companion, the WaterWing, which could be used to pump water out of aqueducts or generate power from pipelines. Kelley said W2 is trying to raise from $5 million to $7 million in its first round of financing as it moves from the proof-of-concept prototype to a new WindWing prototype that is larger and more functional with more controls.

The company also is looking for land to lease where it can construct a cluster of three different sizes. That could be accomplished in the next six months. Once constructed, the site could act as a live demonstration of the technology. That could help W2 move into the market.

The company is looking at all the different entry points to the market, including the farmer who needs to water crops, the household user and the industrial complex in need of power. W2 also wants to build political support.

But when the people behind W2 stand around the prototype as it waves up and down in the hangar, the discussion isn't about money or political will.

"Can you imagine taking this to Africa and using this to drill for water?" Buckalew asks.

Pretlac notes it could be used to drill for water, pump and purify the water and then distribute it.

"That's a dream of ours, and you can see it works," he said.


US Patent Application # 20070040389

Adaptable Flow-Driven Energy Capture System

February 22, 2007

Gene R. Kelley

Abstract

A scalable fluid-driven assembly that is uniquely configured to oscillate in the presence of fluid-flow. The assembly includes an adjustable electromechanically controlled fluidfoil. The fluidfoil is controlled to permit a consistently optimum angle of attack into the prevailing flow and to remain parallel with respect thereto.

Correspondence Name and Address:

Kenneth L. Stein
402 East Gutierrez
Santa Barbara
CA
93101
US

U.S. Current Class: 290/55
U.S. Class at Publication: 290/055
Intern'l Class: F03D 9/00 20060101 F03D009/00

BACKGROUND OF THE INVENTION

[0001] 1. Field of the Invention

[0002] The present invention generally relates to capturing and storing the kinetic energy of a flowing fluid. More particularly, the present invention relates to the capture and storage of wind power and hydropower.

[0003] 2. Description of Related Art

[0004] Windmills and wind turbines are generally well known in the art. Windmills traditionally include a plurality of blades or vanes connected to a rotatable shaft. Wind (or other fluids) act upon the blades to create an aerodynamic or hydrodynamic reaction upon the blades causing the shaft and blades to rotate about the axis of the shaft. Windmills have traditionally been employed across the world to: pump water, grind grain and crush stone. Additionally, windmills have been employed in systems that convert kinetic energy, namely wind, into electrical energy. The rotation of the blades of a windmill drives a generator, which in turn produces an electric current. For applications that require linear actuation, additional mechanical systems are required to translate the rotation of the blades into such linear motion, further complexifying a windmill's operation.

[0005] Wind turbines are designed to work between certain wind speeds. The lower speed, called the `cut in speed` is generally 4-5 ms.sup.-1, as there is too little energy below this speed to overcome system losses. The `cut out speed` is determined by the ability of the particular machine to withstand high wind. The `rated speed` is the wind speed at which the particular machine achieves its maximum rated output. Above this speed, it may have mechanisms that maintain the output at a constant value with increasing wind speed.

[0006] Windmills and wind turbines require frequent repair and maintenance. Blades can be damaged by high winds and the complex mechanisms that have been devised to accommodate for such must be frequently inspected and maintained. Additionally, while windmills and wind turbines present emission-free options to oil- and gas-fueled power plants, they have been implicated in the annual deaths of tens of thousands of birds, some of which are endangered. Besides the loss of life, repair and maintenance are necessitated as a result of a number of such avian fatalities.

[0007] Hydropower plants operate similarly to harness the kinetic energy of flowing water to generate electricity. Hydropower plants generally include a dam, one or more turbines and a corresponding number of generators. Each turbine is positioned at the dam such that water flowing through the dam strikes and turns the turbine's blades. Each turbine is attached to a generator via a shaft such that rotation of the turbine turns the generator producing an electrical current. However, while wind turbines are designed to rotate orthogonal to airflow, hydropower turbines are generally designed to rotate parallel with water flow. Therefore, improvements to wind turbines are not easily translatable to hydropower turbines.

[0008] Therefore, what is needed in the art is a system for capturing and storing the kinetic energy of a flowing fluid. What is further needed is such a system that is simpler in construction and provides greater efficiencies than current wind turbines and/or hydropower turbines. Additionally, what is needed is a system that requires less maintenance and repair.

SUMMARY OF THE INVENTION

[0009] It is to the solution of the hereinabove mentioned problems to which the present invention is directed. In accordance with the present invention there is provided an adaptable flow-driven energy capture system comprising:

[0010] a support mast having a first end and a second end, the support mast affixed a surface at said first end thereof;

[0011] a balance beam having a first end and a second end and extending therebetween, said balance beam comprising a force arm side extending from said first end thereof in the direction of said second end and a load arm side extending from said second end thereof in the direction of said first end, said force arm side and said load arm side coterminating at a balance beam fulcrum, said balance beam pivotally attached the second end of the support mast at the balance beam fulcrum;

[0012] a compensatory weight attached the load arm side of the balance beam at about the second end thereof, said compensatory weight selected to equalize the weight disposed about the balance beam fulcrum;

[0013] a fluidfoil mast comprising and extending between and defining two ends thereof, said fluidfoil mast pivotally connected the force arm side of said balance beam;

[0014] at least one fluidfoil pivotally attached the fluidfoil mast, said at least one fluidfoil having a leading edge and a trailing edge cooperatively defining an edge axis extending therebetween, said fluidfoil further having an orthogonally disposed longitudinal axis;

[0015] an angle of attack positioner attached at each of and disposed between the at least one fluidfoil and the fluidfoil mast, said positioner moderating fluidfoil angle of attack with respect to fluid flow therepast;

[0016] a vane disposed anterior the at least one fluidfoil, said vane registering fluid flow forces that are not parallel with the fluidfoil edge axis;

[0017] at least one control having a support mast end and a fluidfoil support mast end, said control rod pivotally attached thereto and extending parallel the balance beam affixed to the Support Mast.

[0018] It is an object of the present invention to provide a fluidfoil and associated electromechanical assembly capable of extracting energy from low to high velocity prevailing winds for the capture of such.

[0019] It is further an object of the present invention to provide for the selectable control of positive and negative lift on a fluidfoil by changing fluidfoil attitude.

[0020] It is another object of the present invention to provide an energy recapture device for conserving and reusing the energy forces required for controlling fluidfoil transitions from positive to negative lift related orientations.

[0021] The adaptable fluid-driven system of the present invention is uniquely configured to oscillate in the presence of and orthogonal to the direction of fluid flow. Each of the at least one fluidfoil is dynamically positioned to promote a constant and optimum angle of attack.

[0022] A balance beam is rotatably affixed a support mast at a fulcrum point. The balance beam comprises a force arm and a load arm with each extending from opposed ends of the balance beam and coterminating at the fulcrum. The force arm and the load arm are different lengths thereby providing the mechanical advantage that enables the oscillatory motion even in the presence of low energy fluid flow. Energy of such fluid flow is a function of the fluid density and velocity.

[0023] The support mast is affixed a surface and includes a rotational portion disposed at a point along the length thereof such that the mast may rotate at a side of the rotational portion opposed the ground.

[0024] A counterweight is attached to the load arm such that the weight at either side of the balance beam fulcrum is substantially equivalent. Given the unequal lengths of the force arm and the load arm, there is a mechanical advantage at the load arm end of the balance beam equal to the product of the length of the load Arm multiplied by the length of the force arm.

[0025] A fluidfoil is aligned with a fluid flow by a vane attached at the load arm side of the fulcrum. Lift is created across the fluidfoil in proportion to fluid flow velocity and the characteristics of the airfoil well known to those skilled in the art of fluidfoils, such as airfoils. Control rods each extend equidistantly and parallel to the balance beam and are pivotally affixed to the support mast.

[0026] A fluidfoil mast is attached to the balance beam and control rods in a like manner and extends in parallel to the support mast. This arrangement forms a dynamic rhomboid assembly that allows the fluidfoil to maintain an optimum angle of attack into fluid flow by adjusting that angle.

[0027] An angle of attack positioning mechanism adjusts the fluidfoil's angle of attack to a constant positive or negative lift position thus enabling an up and down motion that produces lift in both directions and creating an energy harvesting capability from low velocity as well as high velocity fluid flows including wind and water flow.

[0028] Harvested energy from the fluidfoil is transferred by the lever action of the rhomboid assembly to a connector for energy transfer to one of a variety of energy storage systems for converting the energy of the linear oscillating motion to other desired forms of energy. Such systems include generators or compressors or the like.

[0029] As the fluid foil oscillates through positive and negative lift modes, the energy expended to make the transition is partially recaptured by an energy recapture device. This is a dual function device that dampens and stops the upward or downward motion of the fluidfoil as the angle of attack positioner changes the fluidfoil from a positive to a negative lift or vise versa.

[0030] The transition point at which the foil changes from positive to negative lift and vice versa requires energy to be extracted from the positive upward momentum and stored as the action is stopped and turned around. An energy accumulator in conjunction with cam actions, solenoids, air compression pistons or calibrated springs is employed for this purpose. When this action is completed and the foil reverses its lift generating capability, the stored energy is transferred back to the foil by the energy releasing function of the accumulator to aid in quickly regenerating a negative lift component in the downward cycle. The same occurs in the negative to positive lift transition.

[0031] For a more complete understanding of the present invention, reference is made to the following detailed description and accompanying drawings. In the drawings, like reference characters refer to like parts, in which:

BRIEF DESCRIPTION OF THE DRAWINGS

[0032] FIG. 1 is a plan view of a preferred embodiment of an adaptable flow-driven energy capture system in accordance the present invention;

[0033] FIG. 2 is an elevated lateral perspective view of a balance beam and fluidfoil mast portions of an adaptable flow-driven energy capture system in accordance with a preferred embodiment of the present invention; and

[0034] FIG. 3 is a side perspective view of a the preferred embodiment according to the present invention.

DESCRIPTION OF THE PREFERRED EMBODIMENTS

[0035] Referring to the drawings more particularly by reference numbers, FIGS. 1 and 2 show an adaptable flow-driven energy capture system 10 according to the present invention. The system 10 is uniquely configurable to oscillate in the presence of and orthogonal to the direction of fluid flow (shown as `X`). Fluid flow may include airflow, running water, or some other fluid the properties of which fall within about the properties of water and air.

[0036] The system 10 generally includes a support mast 12, a balance beam 14, a counterweight 16, an angle-of-attack positioner 17 and an at least one fluidfoil 18. The support mast 12 has a first end 20 and a second end 22, the support mast 12 is attached to a ground 24 at said first end 20 thereof. The support mast 12 may be formed from corrosion resistant strong lightweight materials. Additionally, the material should withstand the forces associated with the reciprocating movement of the balance beam 14 resulting from movement of the at least one fluidfoil 18. Aluminum, titanium, composite or some other material well known to one skilled in the art may be used.

[0037] The balance beam 14 has a first end 30 and a second end 32 and extends therebetween. The balance beam 14 is preferably formed from a strong, lightweight material that resists corrosion. Such materials are well known in the art and include aluminum, titanium, or some other material well known for such properties. The balance beam 14 comprises a force arm side 34 extending from said first end 30 thereof in the direction of said second end 32 and a load arm side 36 extending from said second end 32 thereof in the direction of said first end 30, said force arm side 34 and load arm side 36 each coterminate at a balance beam fulcrum 38. The balance beam 14 is pivotally and rotatably attached at the second end 22 of the support mast 12 at the balance beam fulcrum 38.

[0038] The force arm side 34 and the load arm side 36 are different lengths. More particularly, the load arm side 36 of the balance beam 14 is longer than the load arm side 34 providing a mechanical advantage at the force arm side 34 of the balance beam. As discussed further hereinbelow, by configuring the relative lengths of the force arm side 34 and the load arm side 36, one is able to configure the system 10 depending upon the conditions under which the system is operating.

[0039] As shown in FIG. 3, the support mast 12 houses a bearing 50 to which is affixed a support masthead 53 that extends coaxially and rotates about a longitudinal axis of the support mast 12. Force sensing means 55 sense rotational forces at the bearing 50 and precludes rotation of the support masthead 53. Such force sensors are known to those skilled in the art and as such shall not be further discussed herein. The support masthead 53 is preferably formed from materials known to those skilled in the art to function similarly to those comprising the balance beam 14 and the support mast 12.

[0040] The counterweight 16 is attached the load arm side 36 of the balance beam 14 at the second end 32. The counterweight 16 is selected to equalize the weight at either side of the fulcrum 38. The means for attaching the counterweight 16 preferably provide for removably attaching the counterweight 16 such as clamping or bolting, or some other means for removable attachment well known to those skilled in the art. The unequal lengths of the force arm side 34 and the load arm side 36 create a mechanical advantage at the load arm end of the balance beam.

[0041] A fluidfoil mast 40 has a first end 42 and a second end 44 and extends therebetween. The fluidfoil mast 40 is pivotally connected at the force arm side 30 of the balance beam 14. Each at least one fluidfoil 18 is pivotally attached the fluidfoil mast 40 at a fluidfoil pivot point 22. The fluidfoil mast 40 additionally comprises a center section 45 having two opposed ends 49, 51. End sections 53, 55 are rotatably attached one at each end 49, 51 through a motor or some other well-known means for rotating 71 one element relative another. In this fashion, each of the at least one fluid foils 18 can be rotated about the longitudinal axis of the foil support mast 40 as described hereinbelow in greater detail.

[0042] Each fluidfoil 18 comprises a leading edge 50 and a trailing edge 52 that define an edge axis (Y) extending therebetween. As most easily viewed in FIG. 2, each at least one fluidfoil 18 further defines a longitudinal axis (Z). While the system 10 will function with at least one fluidfoil 18 as disclosed, it is to be appreciated that the at least one fluidfoil 18 in the preferred embodiment comprises two substantially identical airfoils 26, 26.

[0043] Lift is created across the at least one fluidfoil 18 in proportion to fluid flow velocity and characteristics of the fluidfoil 18 well known to those skilled in the art of fluidfoils, including airfoils. Control rods 70, 72 each extend preferably equidistantly and parallel to the balance beam 14 and are pivotally affixed to the support masthead 52 and the fluidfoil mast 40 respectively via well-known pivotal mounting means. This arrangement forms a dynamic rhomboid assembly that allows the fluidfoil 18 to maintain an optimum angle of attack into fluid flow by restricting the travel of the fluidfoil mast 40 to remain perpendicular to the ground 24.

[0044] The angle of attack positioner 17 is attached at each of and disposed between the at least one fluidfoil 18 and the fluidfoil mast 40. By pivoting the at least one fluidfoil 18 about pivot point 22, the angle of attack positioner 17 moderates the at least one fluidfoil's 18 angle of attack with respect to fluid flow X therepast. As such, each of the at least one fluidfoil 18 is alternatingly positioned to maintain the angle of attack at a generally constant positive or negative lift position depending upon the direction of travel of the balance beam. Sensing means 80, such as an optical encoder, potentiometer or other well-known rotational sensors is preferably disposed about the fulcrum.

[0045] When the foil reaches the top/bottom of travel as indicated by the position indicated by the sensing means 80, the angle of attack positioner 17 is activated to reverse the angle of attack. As such, given the configuration of the preferred embodiment, the angle of attack positioner is configured to receive such control signals. Varying the angle of attack enables the reciprocating up and down motion that produces lift in both directions and facilitates energy harvesting from low velocity as well as high velocity fluid flows. Note that the terms `up` and `down` are with respect to the defined ground 24.

[0046] While fluid flow velocity is within a predetermined range, the positioner 17 maintains the fluidfoil 18 at an optimum angle of attack to provide maximum lift. When fluid flow exceeds such a range, positioner 17 alters the angle of attack, effectively reducing lift to guard against damaging the system 10. A wind meter, such as the WindMate wind meter produced by SpeedTech, Inc., located in Great Falls, Va. 22066, can be housed within one of the at least one fluidfoil 18 to measure wind speed. Such information is used to adjust the angle of attack at times when wind speeds exceed a selected threshold. Wind meters are well known to those skilled in the art and as such shall not be discussed further herein.

[0047] As the at least one fluidfoil 18 oscillates through positive and negative lift modes, the energy expended to make the transition between such is partially recaptured by an energy recapture device 61. The energy recapture device 61 dampens and stops the upward or downward motion of the at least one fluidfoil 18 as the angle of attack positioner 17 changes the fluidfoil from a positive to a negative lift or vise versa.

[0048] A transition point at which the fluidfoil 18 changes from positive to negative lift and vice versa requires energy to be extracted from the travel momentum and stored as the action is stopped and turned around. An energy accumulator in conjunction with cam actions, solenoids, air compression pistons or calibrated springs is employed for this purpose. Such devices and their function with regard to reciprocating motion are well known in the art. As the fluidfoil reaches it's maximum travel, the energy recapture device 61 drives the movement of the balance beam 14 in the opposite direction from that it was traveling. To aid in quickly regenerating a negative lift component in the downward cycle. The same occurs in the negative to positive lift transition.

[0049] A vane 60 is attached anterior the at least one fluid foil 18. Preferably the vane is positioned at the second end 32 of the balance beam 14. The vane 60 is configured so that fluid flow incident thereto serves to apply rotational force at the force sensing means 55 at the bearing 50. The rotational force, or torque, at the bearing 50 is communicated to the means for rotating 71 at the end sections 53, 55 to rotate the at least one fluidfoil 18 in response to the sensed torque. As such, no rotation takes place at the bearing 50.

[0050] The vane 60 is attached to the balance beam 14 via well-known mounting means including brackets, or bolts and is preferably removably mounted to ease in repair or replacement if such is required. Alternatively, the vane 60 may be permanently affixed by welding or some other well-known means for permanent attachment. Additionally, the vane 60 is preferably formed from a lightweight corrosion-resistant material consistent with the other elements of the preferred embodiment of the present invention.

[0051] Harvested energy from the fluidfoil is transferred by the lever action of the rhomboid assembly to a connector 80 for energy transfer to one of a variety of energy storage systems for converting the energy of the linear oscillating motion to other desired forms of energy. Such systems include, for example electrical generators. Alternatively, the connector 80 may drive a compressor 82 for compressing air.

[0052] While certain exemplary embodiments of the present invention have been described and shown on the accompanying drawings, it is to be understood that such embodiments are merely illustrative of and not restrictive on the broad invention, and that this invention not be limited to the specific constructions and arrangements shown and described, since various other modifications may occur to those ordinarily skilled in the art. As such, what is claimed is:


Wind Energy

U.S. installed wind energy generating capacity: 11,603 megawatts

Worldwide wind energy capacity: 74,223 megawatts

U.S. electricity generated from wind: Estimated 31 billion kilowatt hours, about 0.7 percent of the U.S. electricity supply

Amount of carbon dioxide emitted if 31 billion kilowatt hours were generated from the U.S. electricity fuel mix: 19 million tons

U.S. wind energy potential: 10,777 billion kilowatt hours a year

U.S. industry growth rate: 22 percent average over last five years

Average American homes served by one megawatt of wind capacity: 250-300

Source: American Wind Energy Association


YU63103
OSCILLATION WIND DRIVEN MACHINE

 
2006-08-17
Inventor(s):  BOZOVIC ZORAN [YU]
Classification:   - international:  (IPC1-7): F03D5/00
Abstract --  Oscillation wind driven machine represents a new approach in the use of potential energy of wind in that it works as an oscillator within the resonance, in the regime of laminar flow of fluids, thereby it differs from a standard windmill, in that: it has no wastes induced by turbulent flow of fluids; a driver wing (1) is suspensioned in two or more points thus there is no moment problem seen with propeller of standard windmill; the driver wing engages 20 times more quantity of fluid on the surface circumscribed by the propeller of the standard windmill; machine represents a module that is combined in a whole where dimensions and number of the module are limitted, only by the projected power of the plant; ; the machine projects the range of fluid speeds and within the range it keeps the constant degree of exploitation, where at the slower speeds it transfers less power, and at faster speeds a larger one within the same oscillation frequence.



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