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  June 2019

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http://www.neuroquantology.com/index.php/journal/article/view/2074
Neuroquantology, Vol 17, No 4 (2019)
DOI: 10.14704/nq.2019.17.4.2074   

Life and Consciousness are Guided by a Semi-Harmonic EM Background Field
Dirk K.F. Meijer, Geesink Hans

Abstract
Quantum entangled life conditions and graded states of consciousness in the universe are scale invariant and are guided by a quantum wave meta-language in a superfluid quantum space/ zero-point energy field that is instrumental in creating quantum coherent states through pilot wave resonant connectivity. This interacting dynamic EM field is steering life processes through semi- harmonic tuning of fractal structured water and vibrating macro-molecules such as DNA and hydrated proteins in the cell, including several cell types in the human brain. Consciousness is seen as arising through interaction of life systems with a holographic, field-receptive workspace, that is associated with the brain as a global supervening memory horizon, that is organized through toroidal geometry. Implications for a better understanding of the creation of first life, crucial coherent states in quantum biology, the impact of biofield research and the importance of information in the fabric of reality are discussed. This knowledge can be applied in improving high temperature superconductive properties and the dedicated design of innovative technology for the protection against the potential detrimental effects of EMF in our present world. Our studies show a consistent pattern of discrete EMF frequencies in a wide spectrum of animate and non-animate systems, indicating that a previously unknown biophysical principle seems to be revealed.



https://www.wakingtimes.com/2019/01/16/cdcs-own-expert-vaccine-court-witness-confirmed-vaccines-can-cause-autism-so-they-fired-him-immediately/

CDC’s Own Expert Vaccine Court Witness Confirmed Vaccines Can Cause Autism, So They Fired Him Immediately
by Catherine J. Frompovich

Sharyl Attkisson, an intrepid and forthright journalist, formerly with CBS TV News, has been persistent in her media exposures regarding vaccine-caused health problems, especially the Autism Spectrum Disorder (ASD), ever since she did an in-depth report for CBS, which the media bosses refused to broadcast.  That led to Sharyl’s independent journalism programs, a blessing in disguise.

Recently, Sharyl exposed that CDC’s expert vaccine witness, who previously debunked vaccine autism claims during Vaccinees Injury Masters hearings, Dr. Andrew Zimmerman, a pediatric neurologist, told CDC “long ago” that vaccines could cause Autism, but they refused to accept Zimmerman’s information.  Instead, Department of Justice [DOJ] lawyers immediately fired him.

According to Sharyl,

    Dr. Zimmerman declined our interview request and referred us to his sworn affidavit. It says: On June 15, 2007, he took aside the Department of Justice—or DOJ lawyers he worked for defending vaccines in vaccine court. He told them that he’d discovered “exceptions in which vaccinations could cause autism.” “I explained that in a subset of children, vaccine induced fever and immune stimulation did cause regressive brain disease with features of autism spectrum disorder.”

    “I explained that in a subset of children, vaccine induced fever and immune stimulation did cause regressive brain disease with features of autism spectrum disorder.”  [CJF emphasis]

Attorney Rolf Hazelhurst, a criminal prosecutor, has a vaccine-damaged and autistic son, Yates, born February 11, 2000.  As a result of what the Hazelhurst family has gone through, Attorney Hazelhurst has become an avid vaccine-safety rights legal counsel.  Furthermore, he had Dr. Zimmerman evaluate Yates.

As a result of intensive treatment for autism, Yates is doing much better.

Below is a ten minute+ video report, dated January 6, 2019, Full Measure with Sharyl Attkisson wherein legal actions regarding the “alleged fraud and obstruction of justice” at the vaccine court are discussed.

https://www.youtube.com/watch?v=1XUM2gvfbW8
FULL MEASURE: January 6, 2019 - The Vaccination Debate

Today we investigate one of the biggest medical controversies of our time: vaccines. There’s little dispute about this much-- vaccines save many lives, and rarely, they injure or kill. A special federal vaccine court has paid out billions for injuries from brain damage to death. But not for the form of brain injury we call autism. Now—we have remarkable new information: a respected pro-vaccine medical expert used by the federal government to debunk the vaccine-autism link, says vaccines can cause autism after all. He claims he told that to government officials long ago, but they kept it secret...



https://www.sheffield.ac.uk/news/nr/compound-kills-antibiotic-resistant-superbugs-1.844202
28 May 2019

New compound which kills antibiotic-resistant superbugs discovered

A new compound developed by University of Sheffield experts has killed antibiotic-resistant gram-negative bacteria, including E. coli, during tests
New treatments for gram-negative bacteria are vital as they are rapidly becoming immune to current drugs
Antimicrobial resistance is already responsible for 25,000 deaths in the EU each year
The research could pave the way for new treatment of life-threatening superbugs


A new compound which visualises and kills antibiotic-resistant superbugs has been discovered by scientists at the University of Sheffield and Rutherford Appleton Laboratory (RAL).

The team, led by Professor Jim Thomas, from the University of Sheffield’s Department of Chemistry, is testing new compounds developed by his PhD student Kirsty Smitten on antibiotic resistant gram-negative bacteria, including pathogenic E. coli.

Gram-negative bacteria strains can cause infections including pneumonia, urinary tract infections and bloodstream infections. They are difficult to treat as the cell wall of the bacteria prevents drugs from getting into the microbe.

Antimicrobial resistance is already responsible for 25,000 deaths in the EU each year, and unless this rapidly emerging threat is addressed, it’s estimated by 2050 more than 10 million people could die every year due to antibiotic resistant infections.

Doctors have not had a new treatment for gram-negative bacteria in the last 50 years, and no potential drugs have entered clinical trials since 2010.

The new drug compound has a range of exciting opportunities. As Professor Jim Thomas explains: “As the compound is luminescent it glows when exposed to light. This means the uptake and effect on bacteria can be followed by the advanced microscope techniques available at RAL.

“This breakthrough could lead to vital new treatments to life-threatening superbugs and the growing risk posed by antimicrobial resistance.”

The studies at Sheffield and RAL have shown the compound seems to have several modes of action, making it more difficult for resistance to emerge in the bacteria. The next step of the research will be to test it against other multi-resistant bacteria.

In a recent report on antimicrobial resistant pathogens, the World Health Organisation put several gram-negative bacteria at the top of its list, stating that new treatments for these bacteria were ‘Priority 1 Critical’ because they cause infections with high death rates, are rapidly becoming resistant to all present treatments and are often picked up in hospitals.

The research, published in the journal ACS Nano, describes the new compound which kills gram-negative E. coli, including a multidrug resistant pathogen said to be responsible for millions of antibiotic resistant infections worldwide annually.



https://www.sciencedaily.com/releases/2019/05/190523111357.htm

Researchers at Tampere University have shown for the first time that the cerebral emboli of stroke patients contain DNA from oral pathogens. The research article has been published in the Journal of American Heart Association.

The researchers analysed thrombus aspirates, which neurointerventional radiologists removed from 75 stroke patients as part of emergency treatment. The samples were studied by duplicating bacterial DNA, showing that 79 % of the aspirates contained DNA from bacteria that came from the teeth.

The study is part of a research project at Tampere University, which for ten years has been investigating the effects of bacterial infection in the development of cardiovascular diseases. The research group has previously shown that the same odontogenic bacteria are present in the coronary artery stenoses of patients who have suddenly died, the thrombus aspirates and arterial blood of myocardial infarction patients, ruptured cerebral aneurysms and the thrombus aspirates of patients with lower limb arterial and venous thrombosis.

Cerebral artery thrombosis causes 87 % of strokes. Most thrombi originate in carotid artery stenoses from where they travel to block cerebral circulation.

The results showed that a large amount of DNA from streptococcus viridans -- normal bacteria in the mouth -- was found in cerebral thrombi compared with normal blood samples from the same patients. In the oral cavity, streptococci are harmless, but when entering circulation, they might cause, among other things, infections of the cardiac valves. The streptococcus bacteria can directly bind to various platelet receptors, making the patient more prone to blood clots.

The research shows that oral health and good dental hygiene are of much greater importance to health than previously known, and that untreated dental infections can cause serious health damage or even death.


https://www.tuni.fi/en/news/first-time-finnish-study-proves-presence-oral-bacteria-cerebral-emboli

For the first time, a Finnish study proves the presence of oral bacteria in cerebral emboli

https://www.ahajournals.org/doi/full/10.1161/JAHA.119.012330

Oral Bacterial Signatures in Cerebral Thrombi of Patients With Acute Ischemic Stroke Treated With Thrombectomy
PatrakkaOlli, et al.
4 Jun 2019
https://doi.org/10.1161/JAHA.119.012330Journal of the American Heart Association. 2019;8

Abstract
Background

Chronic infections have been reported to be risk factors for both coronary heart disease and ischemic stroke. DNA of oral bacteria, mainly from the viridans streptococci group, has been detected in coronary thrombus aspirates of myocardial infarction and cerebral aneurysms. Viridans streptococci are known to cause infective endocarditis and possess thrombogenic properties. We studied the presence of oral bacterial DNA in thrombus aspirates of patients with acute ischemic stroke treated with mechanical thrombectomy.
Methods and Results

Thrombus aspirates and arterial blood were taken from 75 patients (69% men; mean age, 67 years) with acute ischemic stroke. The presence of Streptococcus species, mainly the Streptococcus mitis group, belonging to viridans streptococci as well as Porphyromonas gingivalis and Aggregatibacter actinomycetemcomitans in samples were determined using a quantitative polymerase chain reaction with specific primers and probes. The relative amount of bacterial DNA in a sample was determined with the comparative threshold cycle method. Bacterial DNA was detected in 84% (n=63) of aspired thrombi, and 16% (n=12) of samples were considered bacterial DNA negative. DNA of Streptococcus species, mainly the S mitis group, was found in 79% (n=59) of samples. The median relative amount of Streptococcus species DNA was 5.10-fold higher compared with the control blood samples from the same patients. All thrombi were negative for both P gingivalis and A actinomycetemcomitans.
Conclusions

This is the first study showing the common presence of bacterial DNA from viridans streptococci in aspired thrombi of patients with acute ischemic stroke. Streptococcal bacteria, mostly of oral origin, may contribute to the progression and thrombotic events of cerebrovascular diseases.



https://www.sciencedaily.com/releases/2019/05/190522081405.htm
May 22, 2019
Civil War plant medicines blast drug-resistant bacteria in lab tests

...For the current study, the researchers focused on three plant species Porcher cited for antiseptic use that grow in Lullwater Preserve on the Emory campus. They included two common hardwood trees -- the white oak (Quercus alba) and the tulip poplar (Liriodendron tulipifera) -- as well as a thorny, woody shrub commonly known as the devil's walking stick (Aralia spinosa).

Samples of these three plants were gathered from campus specimens, based on Porcher's specifications. Extracts were taken from white oak bark and galls; tulip poplar leaves, root inner bark and branch bark; and the devil's walking stick leaves. The extracts were then tested on three species of multi-drug-resistant bacteria commonly found in wound infections.

Aceinetobacter baumannii -- better known as "Iraqibacter" due to its association with wounded combat troops returning from the Iraq War -- exhibits extensive resistance to most first-line antibiotics. "It's emerging as a major threat for soldiers recovering from battle wounds and for hospitals in general," Quave says.

Staphylococcus aureus is considered the most dangerous of many common staph bacteria and can spread from skin infections or medical devices through the bloodstream and infect distant organs. Klebsiella pneumoniae is another leading cause of hospital infection and can result in life-threatening cases of pneumonia and septic shock.

Laboratory tests showed that extracts from the white oak and tulip poplar inhibited the growth of S. aureus, while the white oak extracts also inhibited the growth of A. baumannii and K. pneumoniae. Extracts from both of these plants also inhibited S. aureus from forming biofilms, which can act like a shield against antibiotics.

Extracts from the devil's walking stick inhibited both biofilm formation and quorum sensing in S. aureus. Quorum sensing is a signaling system that staph bacteria use to manufacture toxins and ramp up virulence. Blocking this system essentially "disarms" the bacteria...



https://www.sciencedaily.com/releases/2019/05/190523143040.htm

How to enhance or suppress memories
Stimulating different parts of the brain can dial up or down a specific memory's emotional oomph, study shows

What if scientists could manipulate your brain so that a traumatic memory lost its emotional power over your psyche? Steve Ramirez, a Boston University neuroscientist fascinated by memory, believes that a small structure in the brain could hold the keys to future therapeutic techniques for treating depression, anxiety, and PTSD, someday allowing clinicians to enhance positive memories or suppress negative ones.

Inside our brains, a cashew-shaped structure called the hippocampus stores the sensory and emotional information that makes up memories, whether they be positive or negative ones. No two memories are exactly alike, and likewise, each memory we have is stored inside a unique combination of brain cells that contain all the environmental and emotional information associated with that memory. The hippocampus itself, although small, comprises many different subregions all working in tandem to recall the elements of a specific memory.

Now, in a new paper in Current Biology, Ramirez and a team of collaborators have shown just how pliable memory is if you know which regions of the hippocampus to stimulate -- which could someday enable personalized treatment for people haunted by particularly troubling memories.

"Many psychiatric disorders, especially PTSD, are based on the idea that after there's a really traumatic experience, the person isn't able to move on because they recall their fear over and over again," says Briana Chen, first author of the paper, who is currently a graduate researcher studying depression at Columbia University.

In their study, Chen and Ramirez, the paper's senior author, show how traumatic memories -- such as those at the root of disorders like PTSD -- can become so emotionally loaded. By artificially activating memory cells in the bottom part of the brain's hippocampus, negative memories can become even more debilitating. In contrast, stimulating memory cells in the top part of the hippocampus can strip bad memories of their emotional oomph, making them less traumatic to remember.

Well, at least if you're a mouse.

Using a technique called optogenetics, Chen and Ramirez mapped out which cells in the hippocampus were being activated when male mice made new memories of positive, neutral, and negative experiences. A positive experience, for example, could be exposure to a female mouse. In contrast, a negative experience could be receiving a startling but mild electrical zap to the feet. Then, identifying which cells were part of the memory-making process (which they did with the help of a glowing green protein designed to literally light up when cells are activated), they were able to artificially trigger those specific memories again later, using laser light to activate the memory cells.

Their studies reveal just how different the roles of the top and bottom parts of the hippocampus are. Activating the top of the hippocampus seems to function like effective exposure therapy, deadening the trauma of reliving bad memories. But activating the bottom part of the hippocampus can impart lasting fear and anxiety-related behavioral changes, hinting that this part of the brain could be overactive when memories become so emotionally charged that they are debilitating.

That distinction, Ramirez says, is critical. He says that it suggests suppressing overactivity in the bottom part of the hippocampus could potentially be used to treat PTSD and anxiety disorders. It could also be the key to enhancing cognitive skills, "like Limitless," he says, referencing the 2011 film starring Bradley Cooper in which the main character takes special pills that drastically improve his memory and brain function.

"The field of memory manipulation is still young.... It sounds like sci-fi but this study is a sneak preview of what's to come in terms of our abilities to artificially enhance or suppress memories," says Ramirez, a BU College of Arts & Sciences assistant professor of psychological and brain sciences. Although the study got its start while Chen and Ramirez were both doing research at Massachusetts Institute of Technology, its data has been the backbone of the first paper to come out of the new laboratory group that Ramirez established at BU in 2017.

"We're a long way from being able to do this in humans, but the proof of concept is here," Chen says. "As Steve likes to say, 'never say never.' Nothing is impossible."

"This is the first step in teasing apart what these [brain] regions do to these really emotional memories.... The first step toward translating this to people, which is the holy grail," says memory researcher Sheena Josselyn, a University of Toronto neuroscientist who was not involved in this study. "[Steve's] group is really unique in trying to see how the brain stores memories with the goal being to help people... they're not just playing around but doing it for a purpose."

Although mouse brains and human brains are very different, Ramirez, who is also a member of the BU Center for Systems Neuroscience and the Center for Memory and Brain, says that learning how these fundamental principles play out in mice is helping his team map out a blueprint of how memory works in people. Being able to activate specific memories on demand, as well as targeted areas of the brain involved in memory, allows the researchers to see exactly what side effects come along with different areas of the brain being overstimulated.

"Let's use what we're learning in mice to make predictions about how memory functions in humans," he says. "If we can create a two-way street to compare how memory works in mice and in humans, we can then ask specific questions [in mice] about how and why memories can have positive or negative effects on psychological health."

This work was supported by a National Institutes of Health Early Independence Award, a Young Investigator Grant from the Brain and Behavior Research Foundation, a Ludwig Family Foundation Grant, and the McKnight Foundation Memory and Cognitive Disorders Award



https://www.geoengineeringwatch.org/an-extensive-list-of-patents/
Geoengineering Patents List



https://www.bibliotecapleyades.net/sociopolitica/sociopol_americanempire124.htm
https://www.bibliotecapleyades.net/sociopolitica2/sociopol_syria40.htm
The Secret History of America's Defeat in Syria



https://www.zerohedge.com/news/2019-05-22/world-getting-increasingly-dumber-study-finds

The World Is Getting Increasingly Dumber, Study Finds
by Tyler Durden

Western Europe is home to a cluster of developed economies that boost some of the highest standards of living in the world. But that could soon change. Because as Evan Horowitz writes on NBC News's new "Think" vertical, IQ scores in France, Scandinavia, Britain, Germany and even Australia are beginning to decline.

The trend has been well-documented across Western Europe, and could soon carry over to the US as well. Which means the data have confirmed what millions of Americans who have watched cable news or logged on to twitter over the past three years probably already suspected: The world is getting dumber.

And just like that, another sign of the 'Idiocracy' apocalypse has emerged. Though, unlike the movie, which posits that the population of Earth will become steadily dumber as stupid people outbreed their more intelligent compatriots, the cause of the trend in Europe has yet to be determined, because even the children of relatively intelligent Europeans are getting dumber.

    Details vary from study to study and from place to place given the available data. IQ shortfalls in Norway and Denmark appear in longstanding tests of military conscripts, whereas information about France is based on a smaller sample and a different test. But the broad pattern has become clearer: Beginning around the turn of the 21st century, many of the most economically advanced nations began experiencing some kind of decline in IQ.

    One potential explanation was quasi-eugenic. As in the movie "Idiocracy," it was suggested that average intelligence is being pulled down because lower-IQ families are having more children ("dysgenic fertility" is the technical term). Alternatively, widening immigration might be bringing less-intelligent newcomers to societies with otherwise higher IQs.

    However, a 2018 study of Norway has punctured these theories by showing that IQs are dropping not just across societies but within families. In other words, the issue is not that educated Norwegians are increasingly outnumbered by lower-IQ immigrants or the children of less-educated citizens. Even children born to high-IQ parents are slipping down the IQ ladder.

Possible explanations include: The rise of smartphones and other devices, which have worn away at our ability to focus, the rise of lower-skill service work that isn't as intellectually stimulating and less-nutritious food.

Whatever the cause, the trend seems to portend a decline in long-term productivity and economic success, factors that have long been correlated with IQ.

But for now, at least, readers can find contentment in the knowledge that it's not just us: Everybody really is getting dumber.



C. oil & enzymes vs S. mutans & Candida albicans:

https://www.brighteon.com/6037220379001
Coconut Oil Is Better Than Any Toothpaste According To New Study

Some Coconut Oil / Dentistry Patents :

US2019083382 -- COMPOSITION FOR REMOVING DENTAL PLAQUE AND TARTAR
WO2019045978 -- ORAL CARE COMPOSITIONS AND METHODS
CN107586600 -- Method for preparing natural coconut oil
 


https://www.bibliotecapleyades.net/esp_sociopol_FEMA.htm
Aggregated Articles re: FEMA / DHS



https://www.bibliotecapleyades.net/sociopolitica/sociopol_americanempire124.htm

The Presidency is now Irrelevant
by Dylan Charles



http://endoftheamericandream.com/archives/20-signs-that-the-nazification-of-america-is-almost-complete
February 15, 2012
25 Signs That America Is Rapidly Becoming More Like Nazi Germany
by Michael Snyder



https://www.youtube.com/watch?v=-ilIO6cAvt0
It's Official - YouTube Hates Me
Mark Dice



https://www.sciencedaily.com/releases/2019/05/190523111357.htm

Researchers at Tampere University have shown for the first time that the cerebral emboli of stroke patients contain DNA from oral pathogens. The research article has been published in the Journal of American Heart Association.

The researchers analysed thrombus aspirates, which neurointerventional radiologists removed from 75 stroke patients as part of emergency treatment. The samples were studied by duplicating bacterial DNA, showing that 79 % of the aspirates contained DNA from bacteria that came from the teeth.

The study is part of a research project at Tampere University, which for ten years has been investigating the effects of bacterial infection in the development of cardiovascular diseases. The research group has previously shown that the same odontogenic bacteria are present in the coronary artery stenoses of patients who have suddenly died, the thrombus aspirates and arterial blood of myocardial infarction patients, ruptured cerebral aneurysms and the thrombus aspirates of patients with lower limb arterial and venous thrombosis.

Cerebral artery thrombosis causes 87 % of strokes. Most thrombi originate in carotid artery stenoses from where they travel to block cerebral circulation.

The results showed that a large amount of DNA from streptococcus viridans -- normal bacteria in the mouth -- was found in cerebral thrombi compared with normal blood samples from the same patients. In the oral cavity, streptococci are harmless, but when entering circulation, they might cause, among other things, infections of the cardiac valves. The streptococcus bacteria can directly bind to various platelet receptors, making the patient more prone to blood clots.

The research shows that oral health and good dental hygiene are of much greater importance to health than previously known, and that untreated dental infections can cause serious health damage or even death.

https://www.tuni.fi/en/news/first-time-finnish-study-proves-presence-oral-bacteria-cerebral-emboli

For the first time, a Finnish study proves the presence of oral bacteria in cerebral emboli

https://www.ahajournals.org/doi/full/10.1161/JAHA.119.012330
4 Jun 2019
Oral Bacterial Signatures in Cerebral Thrombi of Patients With Acute Ischemic Stroke Treated With Thrombectomy
PatrakkaOlli, et al.

https://doi.org/10.1161/JAHA.119.012330Journal of the American Heart Association. 2019;8

Abstract
Background
Chronic infections have been reported to be risk factors for both coronary heart disease and ischemic stroke. DNA of oral bacteria, mainly from the viridans streptococci group, has been detected in coronary thrombus aspirates of myocardial infarction and cerebral aneurysms. Viridans streptococci are known to cause infective endocarditis and possess thrombogenic properties. We studied the presence of oral bacterial DNA in thrombus aspirates of patients with acute ischemic stroke treated with mechanical thrombectomy.

Methods and Results
Thrombus aspirates and arterial blood were taken from 75 patients (69% men; mean age, 67 years) with acute ischemic stroke. The presence of Streptococcus species, mainly the Streptococcus mitis group, belonging to viridans streptococci as well as Porphyromonas gingivalis and Aggregatibacter actinomycetemcomitans in samples were determined using a quantitative polymerase chain reaction with specific primers and probes. The relative amount of bacterial DNA in a sample was determined with the comparative threshold cycle method. Bacterial DNA was detected in 84% (n=63) of aspired thrombi, and 16% (n=12) of samples were considered bacterial DNA negative. DNA of Streptococcus species, mainly the S mitis group, was found in 79% (n=59) of samples. The median relative amount of Streptococcus species DNA was 5.10-fold higher compared with the control blood samples from the same patients. All thrombi were negative for both P gingivalis and A actinomycetemcomitans.

Conclusions
This is the first study showing the common presence of bacterial DNA from viridans streptococci in aspired thrombi of patients with acute ischemic stroke. Streptococcal bacteria, mostly of oral origin, may contribute to the progression and thrombotic events of cerebrovascular diseases.



https://www.sciencedaily.com/releases/2019/05/190522081405.htm
May 22, 2019
Civil War plant medicines blast drug-resistant bacteria in lab tests
Confederate field hospitals turned to traditional remedies under Union blockade

Summary:
A new study based on a mostly forgotten guide to medicinal plants, 'Resources of the Southern Fields and Forests,' focuses on three of the plants and shows they inhibit bacteria associated with wound infections.

During the height of the Civil War, the Confederate Surgeon General commissioned a guide to traditional plant remedies of the South, as battlefield physicians faced high rates of infections among the wounded and shortages of conventional medicines. A new study of three of the plants from this guide -- the white oak, the tulip poplar and the devil's walking stick -- finds that they have antiseptic properties.

Scientific Reports is publishing the results of the study led by scientists at Emory University. The results show that extracts from the plants have antimicrobial activity against one or more of a trio of dangerous species of multi-drug-resistant bacteria associated with wound infections: Acinetobacter baumannii, Staphylococcus aureus and Klebsiella pneumoniae.

"Our findings suggest that the use of these topical therapies may have saved some limbs, and maybe even lives, during the Civil War," says Cassandra Quave, senior author of the paper and assistant professor at Emory's Center for the Study of Human Health and the School of Medicine's Department of Dermatology.

Quave is an ethnobotanist, studying how people use plants in traditional healing practices, to uncover promising candidates for new drugs. "Ethnobotany is essentially the science of survival -- how people get by when limited to what's available in their immediate environment," she says. "The Civil War guide to plant remedies is a great example of that."

"Our research might one day benefit modern wound care, if we can identify which compounds are responsible for the antimicrobial activity," adds Micah Dettweiler, the first author of the paper.

If the active ingredients are identified, "it is my hope that we can then [further] test these molecules in our world-renowned models of bacterial infection," says co-author Daniel Zurawski, chief of pathogenesis and virulence for the Wound Infections Department at the Walter Reed Army Institute of Research.

"I've always been a Civil War buff," Zurawski adds. "I am also a firm believer in learning everything we can garner from the past so we can benefit now from the knowledge and wisdom of our ancestors."

Additional co-authors on the paper include Ryan Reddinger, from the Walter Reed Army Institute of Research; James Lyles, from the Quave lab; and Kate Nelson, from Emory School of Medicine's Department of Dermatology.

Dettweiler was still an Emory undergraduate when he heard about the Civil War plant guide and decided to research it for his honors thesis. He has since graduated with a degree in biology and now works as a research specialist in the Quave lab.

"I was surprised to learn that far more Civil War soldiers died from disease than in battle," he says. "I was also surprised at how common amputation was as a medical treatment for an infected wound."

About one in 13 surviving Civil War soldiers went home with one or more missing limbs, according to the American Battlefield Trust.

At the time of the Civil War, from 1861 to 1865, germ theory was in its developmental stages and only gradually beginning to gain acceptance. Formal medical training for physicians was also in its infancy. An antiseptic was simply defined as a tonic used to prevent "mortification of the flesh." Iodine and bromine were sometimes used to treat infections, according to the National Museum of Civil War Medicine, although the reason for their effectiveness was unknown.

Other conventional medicines available at the time included quinine, for treating malaria, and morphine and chloroform, to block pain.

Military field hospitals within the Confederacy, however, did not have reliable access to these medicines due to a blockade -- the Union Navy closely monitored the major ports of the South to prevent the Confederacy from trading.

Seeking alternatives, the Confederacy commissioned Francis Porcher, a botanist and surgeon from South Carolina, to compile a book of medicinal plants of the Southern states, including plant remedies used by Native Americans and enslaved Africans. "Resources of the Southern Fields and Forests," published in 1863, was a major compendium of uses for different plants, including a description of 37 species for treating gangrene and other infections. Samuel Moore, the Confederate Surgeon General, drew from Porcher's work to produce a document called "Standard supply table of the indigenous remedies for field service and the sick in general hospitals."

For the current study, the researchers focused on three plant species Porcher cited for antiseptic use that grow in Lullwater Preserve on the Emory campus. They included two common hardwood trees -- the white oak (Quercus alba) and the tulip poplar (Liriodendron tulipifera) -- as well as a thorny, woody shrub commonly known as the devil's walking stick (Aralia spinosa).

Samples of these three plants were gathered from campus specimens, based on Porcher's specifications. Extracts were taken from white oak bark and galls; tulip poplar leaves, root inner bark and branch bark; and the devil's walking stick leaves. The extracts were then tested on three species of multi-drug-resistant bacteria commonly found in wound infections.

Aceinetobacter baumannii -- better known as "Iraqibacter" due to its association with wounded combat troops returning from the Iraq War -- exhibits extensive resistance to most first-line antibiotics. "It's emerging as a major threat for soldiers recovering from battle wounds and for hospitals in general," Quave says.

Staphylococcus aureus is considered the most dangerous of many common staph bacteria and can spread from skin infections or medical devices through the bloodstream and infect distant organs. Klebsiella pneumoniae is another leading cause of hospital infection and can result in life-threatening cases of pneumonia and septic shock.

Laboratory tests showed that extracts from the white oak and tulip poplar inhibited the growth of S. aureus, while the white oak extracts also inhibited the growth of A. baumannii and K. pneumoniae. Extracts from both of these plants also inhibited S. aureus from forming biofilms, which can act like a shield against antibiotics.

Extracts from the devil's walking stick inhibited both biofilm formation and quorum sensing in S. aureus. Quorum sensing is a signaling system that staph bacteria use to manufacture toxins and ramp up virulence. Blocking this system essentially "disarms" the bacteria...



https://www.sciencedaily.com/releases/2019/05/190523143040.htm

How to enhance or suppress memories
Stimulating different parts of the brain can dial up or down a specific memory's emotional oomph, study shows

What if scientists could manipulate your brain so that a traumatic memory lost its emotional power over your psyche? Steve Ramirez, a Boston University neuroscientist fascinated by memory, believes that a small structure in the brain could hold the keys to future therapeutic techniques for treating depression, anxiety, and PTSD, someday allowing clinicians to enhance positive memories or suppress negative ones.

Inside our brains, a cashew-shaped structure called the hippocampus stores the sensory and emotional information that makes up memories, whether they be positive or negative ones. No two memories are exactly alike, and likewise, each memory we have is stored inside a unique combination of brain cells that contain all the environmental and emotional information associated with that memory. The hippocampus itself, although small, comprises many different subregions all working in tandem to recall the elements of a specific memory.

Now, in a new paper in Current Biology, Ramirez and a team of collaborators have shown just how pliable memory is if you know which regions of the hippocampus to stimulate -- which could someday enable personalized treatment for people haunted by particularly troubling memories.

"Many psychiatric disorders, especially PTSD, are based on the idea that after there's a really traumatic experience, the person isn't able to move on because they recall their fear over and over again," says Briana Chen, first author of the paper, who is currently a graduate researcher studying depression at Columbia University.

In their study, Chen and Ramirez, the paper's senior author, show how traumatic memories -- such as those at the root of disorders like PTSD -- can become so emotionally loaded. By artificially activating memory cells in the bottom part of the brain's hippocampus, negative memories can become even more debilitating. In contrast, stimulating memory cells in the top part of the hippocampus can strip bad memories of their emotional oomph, making them less traumatic to remember.

Well, at least if you're a mouse.

Using a technique called optogenetics, Chen and Ramirez mapped out which cells in the hippocampus were being activated when male mice made new memories of positive, neutral, and negative experiences. A positive experience, for example, could be exposure to a female mouse. In contrast, a negative experience could be receiving a startling but mild electrical zap to the feet. Then, identifying which cells were part of the memory-making process (which they did with the help of a glowing green protein designed to literally light up when cells are activated), they were able to artificially trigger those specific memories again later, using laser light to activate the memory cells.

Their studies reveal just how different the roles of the top and bottom parts of the hippocampus are. Activating the top of the hippocampus seems to function like effective exposure therapy, deadening the trauma of reliving bad memories. But activating the bottom part of the hippocampus can impart lasting fear and anxiety-related behavioral changes, hinting that this part of the brain could be overactive when memories become so emotionally charged that they are debilitating.

That distinction, Ramirez says, is critical. He says that it suggests suppressing overactivity in the bottom part of the hippocampus could potentially be used to treat PTSD and anxiety disorders. It could also be the key to enhancing cognitive skills, "like Limitless," he says, referencing the 2011 film starring Bradley Cooper in which the main character takes special pills that drastically improve his memory and brain function.

"The field of memory manipulation is still young.... It sounds like sci-fi but this study is a sneak preview of what's to come in terms of our abilities to artificially enhance or suppress memories," says Ramirez, a BU College of Arts & Sciences assistant professor of psychological and brain sciences. Although the study got its start while Chen and Ramirez were both doing research at Massachusetts Institute of Technology, its data has been the backbone of the first paper to come out of the new laboratory group that Ramirez established at BU in 2017.

"We're a long way from being able to do this in humans, but the proof of concept is here," Chen says. "As Steve likes to say, 'never say never.' Nothing is impossible."

"This is the first step in teasing apart what these [brain] regions do to these really emotional memories.... The first step toward translating this to people, which is the holy grail," says memory researcher Sheena Josselyn, a University of Toronto neuroscientist who was not involved in this study. "[Steve's] group is really unique in trying to see how the brain stores memories with the goal being to help people... they're not just playing around but doing it for a purpose."

Although mouse brains and human brains are very different, Ramirez, who is also a member of the BU Center for Systems Neuroscience and the Center for Memory and Brain, says that learning how these fundamental principles play out in mice is helping his team map out a blueprint of how memory works in people. Being able to activate specific memories on demand, as well as targeted areas of the brain involved in memory, allows the researchers to see exactly what side effects come along with different areas of the brain being overstimulated.

"Let's use what we're learning in mice to make predictions about how memory functions in humans," he says. "If we can create a two-way street to compare how memory works in mice and in humans, we can then ask specific questions [in mice] about how and why memories can have positive or negative effects on psychological health."

This work was supported by a National Institutes of Health Early Independence Award, a Young Investigator Grant from the Brain and Behavior Research Foundation, a Ludwig Family Foundation Grant, and the McKnight Foundation Memory and Cognitive Disorders Award



https://www.geoengineeringwatch.org/an-extensive-list-of-patents/
Geoengineering Patents List



https://www.bibliotecapleyades.net/sociopolitica/sociopol_americanempire124.htm
https://www.bibliotecapleyades.net/sociopolitica2/sociopol_syria40.htm
The Secret History of America's Defeat in Syria



https://www.zerohedge.com/news/2019-05-22/world-getting-increasingly-dumber-study-finds

The World Is Getting Increasingly Dumber, Study Finds
by Tyler Durden

Western Europe is home to a cluster of developed economies that boost some of the highest standards of living in the world. But that could soon change. Because as Evan Horowitz writes on NBC News's new "Think" vertical, IQ scores in France, Scandinavia, Britain, Germany and even Australia are beginning to decline.

The trend has been well-documented across Western Europe, and could soon carry over to the US as well. Which means the data have confirmed what millions of Americans who have watched cable news or logged on to twitter over the past three years probably already suspected: The world is getting dumber.

And just like that, another sign of the 'Idiocracy' apocalypse has emerged. Though, unlike the movie, which posits that the population of Earth will become steadily dumber as stupid people outbreed their more intelligent compatriots, the cause of the trend in Europe has yet to be determined, because even the children of relatively intelligent Europeans are getting dumber.

    Details vary from study to study and from place to place given the available data. IQ shortfalls in Norway and Denmark appear in longstanding tests of military conscripts, whereas information about France is based on a smaller sample and a different test. But the broad pattern has become clearer: Beginning around the turn of the 21st century, many of the most economically advanced nations began experiencing some kind of decline in IQ.

    One potential explanation was quasi-eugenic. As in the movie "Idiocracy," it was suggested that average intelligence is being pulled down because lower-IQ families are having more children ("dysgenic fertility" is the technical term). Alternatively, widening immigration might be bringing less-intelligent newcomers to societies with otherwise higher IQs.

    However, a 2018 study of Norway has punctured these theories by showing that IQs are dropping not just across societies but within families. In other words, the issue is not that educated Norwegians are increasingly outnumbered by lower-IQ immigrants or the children of less-educated citizens. Even children born to high-IQ parents are slipping down the IQ ladder.

Possible explanations include: The rise of smartphones and other devices, which have worn away at our ability to focus, the rise of lower-skill service work that isn't as intellectually stimulating and less-nutritious food.

Whatever the cause, the trend seems to portend a decline in long-term productivity and economic success, factors that have long been correlated with IQ.

But for now, at least, readers can find contentment in the knowledge that it's not just us: Everybody really is getting dumber.



C. oil & enzymes vs S. mutans & Candida albicans:

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Coconut Oil Is Better Than Any Toothpaste According To New Study
 


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Aggregated Articles re: FEMA / DHS



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The Presidency is now Irrelevant
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